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Music figures prominently in the state’s heritage, whether blues, rock ‘n’ roll or country. The Mississippi Blues Trail recognizes blues pioneers, including Albert King, Muddy Waters, Sam Cooke and B.B. King. On the Country Music Trail, notable names on about 30 markers include Charley Pride, Conway Twitty, Faith Hill and Tammy Wynette. Learn more about the “Father of Country Music,” Jimmie Rodgers, along with other notable Mississippi musicians, actors and artists at the Mississippi Arts and Entertainment Experience in Meridian.

Nearly everyone the world over recognizes Elvis Presley, the perennial “King of Rock ‘n’ Roll.” The legend’s birthplace and childhood home still stands in Tupelo. Pose next to a life-size statue, portraying him at age 13, and step inside the church where his love for Southern gospel music began.

Another set of markers comprises the Freedom Trail, commemorating the work of men and women in Mississippi during the Civil Rights movement in the 1950s and ’60s. To recognize that era of history, the Museum of Mississippi History and Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in Jackson, the state capital, opened in December 2017 in culmination of the state's bicentennial year.

Schedule time to explore a number of national and state parks, which offer opportunities to play outdoors, or seek out even more cultural pursuits at art museums and galleries. Book a stay at a quaint bed-and-breakfast or enjoy beachside luxury at a Gulf of Mexico resort – and keep those toes tapping.

Visit Mississippi
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Fun Fact

Walter Payton statue in Mississippi
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In 1986, National Football League player and Chicago Bears running back Walter Payton from Columbia, Mississippi, became the first American football player to appear on the front of a Wheaties cereal box.

Coca-Cola memorabilia inside the Biedenharn Coca-Cola Museum
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In 1894, at Biedenharn’s Candy Store in Vicksburg, Joseph Biedenharn bottled Coca-Cola for the first time anywhere in the world.